Governor John W. Bricker

Copyright 2017, J. David Goldin

These are all the examples of this program in the radioGOLDINdex database. These listings are accurate as of October 29, 2017. The programs are listed chronologically, partial dates appear first, unknown dates appear last.


79959. Governor John W. Bricker. April 25, 1944. CBS net, WJAS, Pittsburgh aircheck. An address to "The Ohio Society" (of New York). The only declared candidate for the presidency (and governor of Ohio) advocates the end of the New Deal. He says, "We want no super government or dictatorial world state over us." He considers the gold standard to be the most stable (monetary) system the world has ever known. Bricker's speech is complete, the broadcast is not. John Bricker. 28:49. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

107808. Governor John W. Bricker. October 4, 1944. NBC net, KDKA, Pittsburgh aircheck. 9:30 P.M. The broadcast originates from St. Louis. Governor Bricker is introduced by Missouri Governor Forrest Donnell. The New Deal has set class against class. The New Deal has made vicious and persistant attacks against business. He made a promise that he knew could not be kept...sending American citizens abroad to fight. The New Deal has caused labor strikes. Dewey has been honest with the people of America. The first 21:09 only. John Bricker, Ford Bond (announcer), Forrest Donnell. 21:09. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

107783. Governor John W. Bricker. October 11, 1944. Mutual net, WCAE, Pittsburgh aircheck. 10:30 P.M. A campaign speech from The Armory Building, Tacoma, Washington. Governor (Washinton) Arthur Langley introduces Mr. Bricker with a quote by Harry Truman. Mr. Truman said, "A statesman is only a dead politician. I never want to be a statesman." The Roosevelt administration was never able to provide paid employment in private industry. John Bricker, Arthur Langley, Ford Bond (announcer). 21:00. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

102173. Governor John W. Bricker. October 17, 1944. Blue net, KQV, Pittsburgh aircheck. 11:00 P.M. The broadcast originates from Lane Field, San Diego. The Governor of Ohio (and candidate for Vice President on the Dewey ticket) speaks against the "New Deal" and President Roosevelt. During this first part of his speech, Mr. Bricker says nothing positive about Governor Dewey, in fact, he barely mentions him. Governor Bricker is introduced by Ginger Rogers (who is obviously reading a script). The first 20:46 only. John Bricker, Ginger Rogers, Ford Bond (announcer). 20:46. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

107788. Governor John W. Bricker. October 27, 1944. Red net, KDKA, Pittsburgh aircheck. 10:30 P.M. A campaign speech, originating from Kansas City, Missouri. "Missouri is no longer a doubtful state." "A sound foreign policy depends on the election of Dewey." "You cannot wage war with leaf raking and boondoggling." "He did not keep us out of war." "Mr. Roosevelt's defense and foreign policy record is one of vacillation, confusion, secrecy and bungling." John Bricker. 21:09. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

102157. Governor John W. Bricker. October 30, 1944. Blue net, WCAE, Pittsburgh aircheck. The Republican candidate for Vice-President speaks from the Olympia Arena in Detroit. He is introduced by Governor Harry Kelly (Michigan). Mr. Bricker accuses Roosevelt of shielding Communists in his administration and that he (Roosevelt) is a "political prisoner" of the Communist Party. The first 21:04 only. John Bricker, Harry Kelly, Ford Bond (announcer). 21:04. Audio condition: Excellent. Incomplete.

107765. Governor John W. Bricker. November 3, 1944. Blue net, KQV, Pittsburgh aircheck. 9:30 P.M. The Republican candidate for Vice President speaks from the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia. This is his final campaign speech before the election. "Mr. Dewey doesn't believe in 1-man government." "We are being taken for a judicial ride by the Supreme Court." The first 20:39 only. John Bricker. 20:39. Audio condition: Very good to excellent. Incomplete.

Report contains 7 programs.